After a Russian-made missile struck a town and killed two people, Poland is considering using NATO Article 4.

Two Poles were killed by a Russian-made rocket on Tuesday, heightening worries that Russia’s conflict in Ukraine might spill into NATO territory.

The origin of the missile and the reason it struck Poland are still unknown.

Approximately around the same time as Russia started its largest wave of missile strikes on Ukrainian towns in more than a month, a missile fell outside the little Polish settlement of Przewodow.

The explosion location, which is four miles west of the Ukrainian border, was shown in local media as having a crater and an overturned farm truck. CNN is unable to independently verify the images. A sizable smoke cloud can be seen in the village’s center in a resident’s video that CNN geolocated and verified.

A local neighbor told CNN that when the missile sailed over the village, they heard a horrifying “whoosh,” and the caretaker of a nearby school noted that the power of the explosion rattled classroom windows.

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization has Poland as a member (NATO). According to Polish authorities, Warsaw is contemplating using NATO Article 4 to raise its concerns with the security alliance’s governing body and will also prepare more Polish forces for conflict.
Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki stated in a speech on Tuesday that “we decided to increase the combat readiness of selected units of the Polish armed forces, with particular emphasis on airspace monitoring,” adding that “airspace monitoring is and will be carried out in an enhanced manner together with our allies.”

After a Russian-made missile struck a town and killed two people, Poland is considering using NATO Article 4.

Morawiecki emphasized that there is no proof of further missiles and that the evidence points to the missile that fell as a “single act.”
In response to the event, Poland’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs has called the Russian ambassador.

In a brief statement released late Tuesday, the Russian Defense Ministry said that earlier on Tuesday it had disputed that the border had been targeted and described the Polish media’s first claims of the killings as “a planned provocation in order to worsen the situation.”

“There were no attacks made on targets near the Ukrainian-Polish state boundary,” it said. “The assertions of the Polish media and authorities regarding the purported fall of “Russian” missiles in the region of the town of Przewodow are a deliberate provocation to worsen the situation.”

It also said that “Russian weaponry had nothing to do with the wreckage images from the site in the hamlet of Przewodow released by the Polish media.”

Dmitry Peskov, a spokesman for the Kremlin, told CNN that he was unaware of any explosions taking place in Poland.

The origin of the missile and the reason it struck Poland are still unknown.

Approximately around the same time as Russia started its largest wave of missile strikes on Ukrainian towns in more than a month, a missile fell outside the little Polish settlement of Przewodow.

The explosion location, which is four miles west of the Ukrainian border, was shown in local media as having a crater and an overturned farm truck. CNN is unable to independently verify the images. A sizable smoke cloud can be seen in the village’s center in a resident’s video that CNN geolocated and verified.

A local neighbor told CNN that when the missile sailed over the village, they heard a horrifying “whoosh,” and the caretaker of a nearby school noted that the power of the explosion rattled classroom windows.

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization has Poland as a member (NATO). According to Polish authorities, Warsaw is contemplating using NATO Article 4 to raise its concerns with the security alliance’s governing body and will also prepare more Polish forces for conflict.
Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki stated in a speech on Tuesday that “we decided to increase the combat readiness of selected units of the Polish armed forces, with particular emphasis on airspace monitoring,” adding that “airspace monitoring is and will be carried out in an enhanced manner together with our allies.”

Morawiecki emphasized that there is no proof of further missiles and that the evidence points to the missile that fell as a “single act.”
In response to the event, Poland’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs has called the Russian ambassador.

In a brief statement released late Tuesday, the Russian Defense Ministry said that earlier on Tuesday it had disputed that the border had been targeted and described the Polish media’s first claims of the killings as “a planned provocation in order to worsen the situation.”

“There were no attacks made on targets near the Ukrainian-Polish state boundary,” it said. “The assertions of the Polish media and authorities regarding the purported fall of “Russian” missiles in the region of the town of Przewodow are a deliberate provocation to worsen the situation.”

It also said that “Russian weaponry had nothing to do with the wreckage images from the site in the hamlet of Przewodow released by the Polish media.”

Dmitry Peskov, a spokesman for the Kremlin, told CNN that he was unaware of any explosions taking place in Poland.

“It’s important to determine all the facts”

In a speech on Tuesday, Polish President Andrzej Duda highlighted that Poland does not know who launched the missile but said that it was “most likely built in Russia.”

Duda encouraged calm and assured the nation of the backing of NATO partners during a speech from the Bureau of National Security in Warsaw. He stated, “We are working quietly and in a very tranquil way.”

According to Duda, the United States is sending specialists to evaluate the location, and any further investigations would be conducted jointly.

After discussing the incident with Polish President Andrzej Duda on Tuesday, NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg said that it was “essential that all facts be confirmed.”
“I expressed my sympathy for the death. The Allies are closely collaborating, and NATO is keeping an eye on the situation. “It’s crucial that all the facts be confirmed,” Stoltenberg said in a tweet.

The event drew the notice of NATO members. Some spoke cautiously, neither guessing at the explosion’s source nor confirming it.

According to a summary of the conversation, US Vice President Joe Biden talked with Duda and “reaffirmed the United States’ unwavering commitment to NATO.”

After a Russian-made missile struck a town and killed two people, Poland is considering using NATO Article 4.

According to a representative for the Elysee Palace on Tuesday, after news of the incident in Poland, French President Emmanuel Macron requested discussions at the G20 conference on Wednesday, which Biden is attending.
According to a French military source who spoke to CNN, France is “very cautious” and the authorities won’t make any statements until they can “examine all the available material.”

Tuesday, during a conversation with Duda, British Prime Minister Rishi Sunak reiterated his country’s “solidarity with Poland” and offered his sympathies to the victims.

While highlighting their preparedness to protect NATO territory, Baltic NATO members were more forceful in their declarations.

According to a Twitter message from the Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the news is “very worrying.” It said, “Estonia is prepared to protect every square inch of NATO territory.”

Even though Polish officials had not yet confirmed that a Russian missile had fallen on their soil, Latvia’s defense minister, Artis Pabriks, blamed Russia and called the event a “crime.”

Volodymyr Zelensky, the president of Ukraine, which is not a member of NATO, blamed Moscow as well. “Using missiles to attack NATO territory is a Russian attack on global security.” “We must take action because of the serious escalation,” he added.

NATO Article 4 is invoked.

30 countries from North America and Europe make up the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. By using political and military methods, NATO claims that its goal is to “ensure the freedom and security of its members.”

In reaction to the beginning of the Cold War, the alliance was formed in 1949. Its initial goal was to defend the West from the Soviet Union’s threat. Many former Soviet countries have joined NATO after the end of the Cold War, much to Putin’s chagrin.

Article 4 is a consultation procedure that enables members to present a problem, often a security one, impacting them for debate at the North Atlantic Council, the alliance’s decision-making body. Poland is now contemplating this option.

The article stipulates that “the Parties will consult jointly if, in the judgment of either of them, the territorial integrity, political independence, or security of either of them is endangered.”

Article 5 of the treaty, which, if used, states that “an assault on one ally is treated as an attack against all allies,” is the most well-known feature of the alliance. It has only ever been activated once, in response to the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the United States.
However, the alliance has already taken collective defense actions in response to the Russian invasion of Ukraine without using Article 5.

Vladimir Putin, the president of Russia, has long complained that NATO has widened its borders over time by including former Soviet Union member states in Eastern Europe. As a result, Russia now shares a land border with the largest military alliance in the world, which diminishes Putin’s geopolitical influence in the area that was once under the control of Moscow.

He was requesting a return to the NATO boundaries from 1997, before the Baltic states of Latvia, Lithuania, and Estonia—the latter two of which border Russia—joined the alliance as recently as February.

From: Haotees

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

×
×